The Internet of Things

Products on the market have become more complex than ever before. With the term “Internet of Things” having been coined by entrepreneur Kevin Ashton in 1999, this term has become a huge part of today’s market, and is being built today. The Internet of Things allows for a direct connection between physical objects and computer-based systems that has allowed for increased efficiency and accuracy. By adding sensors and network connectivity to everyday objects, people and other devices are able to interact with them, therefore allowing them to be more valuable to users. This term may be new or one you are unfamiliar with, but we are now surrounded by the relationships that it describes.

Products on the market have become more complex than ever before. With the term “Internet of Things” having been coined by entrepreneur Kevin Ashton in 1999, this term has become a huge part of today’s market, and is being built today. The Internet of Things allows for a direct connection between physical objects and computer-based systems that has allowed for increased efficiency and accuracy. By adding sensors and network connectivity to everyday objects, people and other devices are able to interact with them, therefore allowing them to be more valuable to users. This term may be new or one you are unfamiliar with, but we are now surrounded by the relationships that it describes. For example, our last blog post about the Fitbit is a great example. The device, which you wear as a watch, tracks events from every step you take to how much sleep you get, but the results aren’t displayed on the tiny digital screen on your wrist. By downloading the Fitbit app (that can be downloaded onto any Smartphone) or logging in online, an individual is able to see on their easy-to-read dashboard all of the data gathered from their device. The Fitbit automatically syncs with your account, which allows for the connectivity to enable objects to exchange data.

The Internet of Things is expected to include and expand upon machine-to-machine (M2M) communication while covering a variety of protocols, domains, and applications. Alone the internet is just a way to communicate and gather information across a large network, so by pairing products with the internet, you can actually transform the nature of the “thing” itself. These expanded capabilities of smart, connected products and the data they generate are the driving forces behind the emergence of this new era of competition.

Google has chosen Carnegie Mellon University to lead a multi-university project to create new technology for the Internet of Things. Check out our next blog post for more information about this upcoming project! For example, our last blog post about the Fitbit is a great example. The device, which you wear as a watch, tracks events from every step you take to how much sleep you get, but the results aren’t displayed on the tiny digital screen on your wrist. By downloading the Fitbit app (that can be downloaded onto any Smartphone) or logging in online, an individual is able to see on their easy-to-read dashboard all of the data gathered from their device. The Fitbit automatically syncs with your account, which allows for the connectivity to enable objects to exchange data.

The Internet of Things is expected to include and expand upon machine-to-machine (M2M) communication while covering a variety of protocols, domains, and applications. Alone the internet is just a way to communicate and gather information across a large network, so by pairing products with the internet, you can actually transform the nature of the “thing” itself. These expanded capabilities of smart, connected products and the data they generate are the driving forces behind the emergence of this new era of competition.

Google has chosen Carnegie Mellon University to lead a multi-universal project to create new technology for the Internet of Things. Check out our next blog post for more information about this upcoming project!

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